Kirjoittaja Aihe: Plant Psychology  (Luettu 4272 kertaa)

Poissa scion

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Plant Psychology
« : Elokuu 11, 2013, 21:45:22 ip »
As a new hobby gardener I have a lot of questions. May be some of the questions were not be so important but my curiosity pushes me to ask the questions  :).

Plants have no brain so there may not be a question of "plant psychology". This question arises due to my practical experiences. I do not have enough space for my plants so I moved them so many times before, at least twice/thrice a day. The plants are getting bigger and moving around damage a lot of new branches too. Some of the plants I stopped moving around and I found that they have grown more natural and better than the frequently moving one. Touching and bending the leaves and branches to find insects/bugs are not what I meant. I moved them from one location to other location. I am not sure it is the plants' psychology or my psychology. In any case I think my plants do not like to be disturb.

Have you got any experiences just like I have? I am looking for your opinions.

Another question here is "How long ripe pods can stay on the plants without any damage?" I have many Super Hot Chili plants with ripe pods. They are so beautiful I have been waiting to get ripe most of them in the plants. I think if I removed all the ripe pods then there should be possible to get second harvest but I do not care much about it. Still the plants are getting flowers and new pods too.

Thanks in advance.

Scion
« Viimeksi muokattu: Elokuu 11, 2013, 22:16:48 ip kirjoittanut scion »

Poissa davve

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Vs: Plant Psychology
« Vastaus #1 : Elokuu 11, 2013, 22:19:52 ip »
Hello. I rather suspect your plants disagree to having the incident direction of light changed frequently. Plants tend to turn the leaves towards the light, as mainly the upper side is active in the photosynthesis. Can it be that your plant "looses its directions" when you move it about?

Don't know too well about all varieties, but at leat Trinidad Scorpion gets the better the more over-ripe you let it become. When the pod starts to get soft and almost mushy again, then you get an aroma that rises straight into your heat, without even tasting the stuff...

Poissa scion

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Vs: Plant Psychology
« Vastaus #2 : Elokuu 11, 2013, 23:27:36 ip »
Hello Davve, thank you for the quick response and opinions.

I think so it could be related with photosynthesis.

I have many Scorpion Moruga Blend Yellow they are getting ripe, I will keep them for over-ripe. Rocoto De Seda are getting change color, Ghost and Fatali are not yet ripe.

Scion

Poissa Dethlock

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Vs: Plant Psychology
« Vastaus #3 : Elokuu 12, 2013, 00:13:19 ap »
I wouldn't call it plant psychology but in my pretty limited perspective (I'm new to chilies) I have noticed that the plants I move around or handle a lot seem to be doing worse than the ones I hardly notice so I would say moving them around all the time kinda disturbs them.

Actually the plants I have neglected the most where the first ones who even tried to produce pods. Seems to me that even a bit poor conditions (light, water and nutrition) produce better results than over-doing it. I have recently taken the 'let nature go it's way'-approach and just refill the water every now and then, check for varmints daily and pick up the old leaves/flowers when I notice them.
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Poissa scion

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Vs: Plant Psychology
« Vastaus #4 : Elokuu 12, 2013, 19:47:09 ip »
Hi Dethlock, thank you for the input. Over doing such as over fertilize/water is really giving a lot of problems to the plants.

Scion